Mid-Year Goal Review

It’s hard to believe that we’re in June already. Where did the first part of the year go? I’m taking a breath this week and with that comes a reflection on what I’ve managed to achieve in the first part of the year and set myself up for the second half of the year.

While the first part of the year has zipped on by I’ve had some successes and some misses.

In the successes category I’ve got a new computer and restructured my catalog and back-up strategy. I’ve started posting regularly on instagram and used some of those images to make a small handmade book. Which in turn gave me a project to learn more about InDesign. I’ve gotten clearer about my why for photographing, something that I have wrestled with and continue to wrestle with. The struggle is real! As a result of my regular posting on instagram I’ve photographed more, all with the iPhone, and found myself hitting the limits of the iPhone as a camera.

There are lots of things that I haven’t done of course. I had plans to photograph and compile a family cookbook. I started taking pictures for that but haven’t gotten very far with it. Perhaps for Christmas 2022? There are many other things that have been pushed to one side to make room for photography, blogging and instagram. As I look now towards the next 6 months I’m thinking about what do I want to achieve by the end of the year.

Elizabeth King tells us that ‘Process Saves us From the Poverty of Our Intentions‘ which really resonated when I first came across it and still does. Having a daily practice of creating is the only way for me to accomplish all of the different things I have up in the air.

It is also fitting because I’ve been thinking a lot about intentions vs goals. They can seem like the same thinking but are subtly different. I like to think that intentions describe a desired end state, The Why. Plans are where the process fits in and are the How. Goals are the things that will need to be achieved in order to get there – The What.

Still some work to do to nail down intentions for the second half of the year but it’d definitely coming into focus.

How about you – Goals? Intentions? Plans? None of the above but just see where the breeze blows you? I’d love to hear about your process.

Ways to Present Your Work

Having looked through the boxes of prints that I have it made me think about how we share our work with the world.

If you’re like me then one of the most exciting was to offer my work into the world is in the form of a book. To do this using the traditional offset printing route can be an expensive undertaking. Print on demand services such as Blurb or MagCloud are certainly a pragmatic alternative but the unit cost of the book can be a little steep.

I’ve been thinking about alternatives to the print on demand style books such as handmade ‘artists books’. More about that in coming posts.

An alternative to the book is the folio – a concept that I believe Brooks Jensen originated.

A folio is a collection of loose prints, with or without text, in an enclosure. I made some for my ‘Going Coastal’ project many years ago, take a look at the video below to get a better a sense of this.

I really like this idea – it’s a book like object, manageable in size and can be produced relatively easily. I think more of us interested in presenting our work as books should explore the concept.

Friday Inspiration: Ellie Davies

The image above is from Ellie Davies ‘Stars’ portfolio created by combining images of the forests of southern England with Hubble telescope images. For many forests are magical fairytale places for others, myself included, they are dark and scary places. Yet I find the Stars series of images compelling, they draw me in, make me want to step forward and cause me to look closer.

I have been thinking about how a single theme can be developed and extended – Ellie’s projects are a great case study. Silent, Deep and Dark serves as an entry point, both literally and figuratively, into the forests. This body of work explores the forest boundaries – the edge between outside and inside, light and dark. From here Ellie begins to interact with the forest, weaving patterns with wool, highlighting pathways with paint, powder, wool and paper, building structures that are reminiscent of barnacles or anemones, incorporating stars and most recently suggesting the presence of people by the introduction of fires.

Watch and listen to Ellie describe here work below and find out more about here.

Friday Inspiration: Barbara Bosworth – The Heavens

I had been looking at some Michael Kenna images over the last weekend and in looking at his moonrise image came across Barbara Bosworth’s image from her new book ‘The Heavens’. I was intrigued enough to dig a little deeper.

Heavens is a photographic celebration of the not just the night sky but the moon, the heavens (stars) and sun. I enjoyed looking at the pictures of the moon and stars. They reminded me of looking at the stars with my dad on the walk home from my grans house as a child. I’m always interested in how photography can show us things that we wouldn’t otherwise see or allow us to experience in a different way. The image above is one example, there are others in the book including photographs of sun spots which I found fascinating. The

I am always keen to seen behind the curtain to get a sense of the creative process and I was not disappointed in this regard either. The appendix includes ephemera that went into supporting the project – books, a planisphere and copies of Barbara’s darkroom notebook pages relevant to her work on images that went into the book.

The Heavens portfolio can be found on her website here and you can find out more about Barbara here.

Listen to Barbara discuss one of her earlier projects ‘Birds and other Angels’ below.


Friday Inspiration: Alec Soth

Soth

In my stumble through contemporary landscape photographers I recently found Alec Soth, and particularly his recent photo book ‘Songbook‘ in which he is exploring physical social interactions in a world of social media.

I’m still digging into the rich world of Alec Soth, there’s lots to go at! His self published book ‘Sleeping by the Mississippi‘ caught the attention of the curators of the Whitney Biennial in 2004 and his inclusion in the exhibition launched him on a larger stage. The image above from his ‘Sleeping by the Mississippi’ project was used for the poster for the exhibit. He became a nominee of the Magnum Photos agency in 2004 and a full member in 2008. Since his first book in 2004 he has produced over 20 others, including Songbook, and a number in collaboration with writer Brad Zellar. He founded the publishing company Little Brown Mushroom in 2008 to publish his own books and those of others interested in a similar narrative approach to telling visual stories. A very busy guy!

See Alec talk more about his work in the videos below.

Alec Soth et Roe Ethridge (April 28, 2013) from Paris Photo on Vimeo.