Friday Inspiration: Joesp Pla-Nabona

I recently came across the work of Josep Pla-Narbona – a graphic designer, painter and sculpturer. Born in Barcelona, Spain, in 1928, he worked with advertising agencies early in his career producing work such as the advertising poster above. Many of his posters from this time remind me of some of the board books that we read to the kids when they were younger. In the second part of his career his focus has been on engraving, painting, drawing and sculpture.

I found the video below first and enjoyed Josep’s playfulness and thought that he was worth looking into further. Check out the video below (you may need to turn the subtitles on !) and learn more about his work here.

Friday Inspiration: A Conversation with Ed O’Brien

I’ve been taking a deeper dive into the guitar again in recent months and have enjoyed the unabashed geekery from the ‘That Pedal Show‘ guys. I’ve also learned a lot over the course of the many episodes of the show that I’ve watched, although I don’t have the ears that Mick and Dan have to discern the nuance in the various amps and pedals that they discuss.

I wanted to share this particular episode with Ed O’Brien one of the guitarists from Radiohead because I really enjoy listening to creative people at the top of their game talk about their process. There are many parallels between the various creative arts that I think that we can learn from and apply to our work some of the ideas from other disciplines.

If you’re not interested in the guitar stuff skip ahead to 17:17 which is about where Ed starts talking about his process.

Friday Inspiration: Ellie Davies

The image above is from Ellie Davies ‘Stars’ portfolio created by combining images of the forests of southern England with Hubble telescope images. For many forests are magical fairytale places for others, myself included, they are dark and scary places. Yet I find the Stars series of images compelling, they draw me in, make me want to step forward and cause me to look closer.

I have been thinking about how a single theme can be developed and extended – Ellie’s projects are a great case study. Silent, Deep and Dark serves as an entry point, both literally and figuratively, into the forests. This body of work explores the forest boundaries – the edge between outside and inside, light and dark. From here Ellie begins to interact with the forest, weaving patterns with wool, highlighting pathways with paint, powder, wool and paper, building structures that are reminiscent of barnacles or anemones, incorporating stars and most recently suggesting the presence of people by the introduction of fires.

Watch and listen to Ellie describe here work below and find out more about here.

Friday Inspiration: Victoria Sambunaris

sambunaris

After running through a string a contemporary landscape photographers in recent weeks I could help but recognize that all of these were guys which made me wonder who were the women active in this genre. It was then that I remembered the fabulous book by Victoria Sambunaris, ‘Taxonomy of a Landscape‘ that I had recently came across. The book documents a decade long exploration of the American landscape and our place in it. In fact it’s two books, the companion volume collects the associated research materials and other bits and pieces that Sambunaris accumulated during the course of the project. A fascinating behind the scenes look into her process.

For more information on Sambunaris and her projects check out the video here and the embeded video below.

Victoria Sambunaris lecture, February 7, 2013 from MoCP, Columbia College Chicago on Vimeo.

Friday Inspiration: Alec Soth

Soth

In my stumble through contemporary landscape photographers I recently found Alec Soth, and particularly his recent photo book ‘Songbook‘ in which he is exploring physical social interactions in a world of social media.

I’m still digging into the rich world of Alec Soth, there’s lots to go at! His self published book ‘Sleeping by the Mississippi‘ caught the attention of the curators of the Whitney Biennial in 2004 and his inclusion in the exhibition launched him on a larger stage. The image above from his ‘Sleeping by the Mississippi’ project was used for the poster for the exhibit. He became a nominee of the Magnum Photos agency in 2004 and a full member in 2008. Since his first book in 2004 he has produced over 20 others, including Songbook, and a number in collaboration with writer Brad Zellar. He founded the publishing company Little Brown Mushroom in 2008 to publish his own books and those of others interested in a similar narrative approach to telling visual stories. A very busy guy!

See Alec talk more about his work in the videos below.

Alec Soth et Roe Ethridge (April 28, 2013) from Paris Photo on Vimeo.

Friday Inspiration: Richard Misrach

misrach

I am continuing to enjoy hopscotching through ‘contemporary’ photographers, spending some time in the last week looking at the work of Richard Misrach. Until recently my exposure to Misrach’s work had been the image above and few others in this series. This series of images are striking but I didn’t dig deeper into the origins of this work something which Misrach gets into in the video below.

I have yet to deeply explore the work that Misrach is perhaps most well know for – his on-going project called ‘Desert Cantos’, photographs of the deserts of the american west – spending more time looking at his work associated with hurricane Katrina and of what he calls ‘cancer alley’. These two projects resulted in the books ‘Destroy this memory‘ and ‘Petrochemical America‘.

While it could be argued that all of his work deals with man’s rather complex relationship with the environment the Petrochemical America project really struck home for me. Will we ever put long term sustainability before short term gains? I’m going to continue digging into Misrach’s work. For now watch Richard Misrach talk about his work in the videos below.